Bugatti type 57 aerolithe




Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

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  • Bugatti intended to manufacture the Aérolithe and other prototype Type 57S cars from Electron, an alloy of magnesium and aluminum from IG.

    Even by Bugatti standards, the Aerolithe was no ordinary car. Built a few years before the infamous type 57SC Atlantics, the Aerolithe clearly.

    Two Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantics at Pebble Beach in Monteray, overhead -cam engine, making the Aérolithe the most advanced car of.

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    It quickly became the defining quirk of the Bugatti Aerolithe's design, and became so well known that the riveted ridges were carried over to the Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic road cars that were inspired by the Aerolithe - even though the Atlantics used conventional aluminum body panels. It used the 3. Retrieved 1 January Cookies This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. This construction technique came about because the magnesium alloy used in an earlier Bugatti models was problematic to weld.

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    Bugatti Type 57 - Wikipedia

    The history books may officially say the Buick Y-Job is the auto industry's first ever concept car, but the trend of designing one-off experimental design mock ups goes back a bit further than that.

    It could be argued, for instance, that Audi's streamlined 'Paul Jaray Prototype' from most famous, perhaps, for featuring in this Audi A5 commercial was a concept car of sorts. However, a more suitable pre-Y-Job candidate for the first ever concept car as we know of them today would be the stunning Bugatti Aerolithe from Designed by Jean Bugatti the son of company founder Ettore Bugatti, and the man who envisioned the gorgeous coachwork of various Type 41 'Royale' and Type 57 variants , the Aerolithe was an incredibly striking car for its time.

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    The Type sourced running gear, for instance, made it potentially one of the fastest cars in the world at the time - the straight-eight engine's horsepower was an awful lot of grunt by the standards of !

    What really made the Aerolithe stand out, though, was the bodywork construction - instead of the aluminum sheets that usually clothed Bugatti sports cars, the panels were crafted out of a lightweight-yet-strong 'Elektron' magnesium alloy, which was essentially the pre-war equivalent of carbon fiber.

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    Those of you who paid attention in your high school chemistry classes will remember that magnesium is a highly flammable metal, making it an incredibly difficult material to use in welding.

    To keep the Aerolithe's panels together, then, Jean Bugatti accommodated the use of external rivets to hold the bodywork in place, with ridges along the roof and fenders being added to allow the engineers to bolt the coachwork into place. It quickly became the defining quirk of the Bugatti Aerolithe's design, and became so well known that the riveted ridges were carried over to the Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic road cars that were inspired by the Aerolithe - even though the Atlantics used conventional aluminum body panels.

    Despite being such a headline-grabbing car for Bugatti, the Aerolithe wasn't paraded that much in public. Bar appearances at the Paris and London motor shows in , the car rarely if ever left Bugatti's Molsheim facilities. A great shame, considering how important and iconic a car the Bugatti Aerolithe is. All is not totally lost, however. Almost a decade ago, the Guild of Automotive Restorers in Canada set out to create a replica of the Aerolithe, using period photographs, original blueprints and surviving Type 57 running gear as a base.

    Bugatti type 57 aerolithe

    By , the finished replica was complete, and afterwards proudly displayed at high profile automotive gatherings like The Quail. Sure, you can argue that it's not really an Aerolithe, but it's the closest we have of one right now, and it means we can still appreciate the design and craftsmanship that went behind bringing to fruition one of the the greatest ever concept cars.

    French automaker's latest concept drives itself towards an autonomous future. The "race" was staged to promote the release of Forza Horizon 4. With his astrophysicist friend, Neil deGrasse Tyson riding shotgun.

    Ralph Lauren $40mln Bugatti Type 57 SC Atlantic - 3x Start Up & Drive Scene!!



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